Scrum, Kanban, Scrumban or Just Ban Scrum? (Part 1 of 2)

Part I: Some Problems

I have been playing the Scrum Master role off and on since 2008, almost all of it for geographically distributed teams. During this period, I have been lucky enough to work for 3 different companies in 4 countries. Over the years, a sinking feeling has been growing within me that we have started using “Agility” to mask unwillingness (or I dare say, often, inability) to commit. Allow me to crystallize some of the thoughts that are forming in my head.

(My usual disclaimer applies: none of the below is intended to reflect on my employer(s) or specific colleagues, whether past or present. These are my personal, generalized opinions intended for retrospection.)

ScrumTF

Ceremonies and Metrics

First and foremost, if you don’t have Sprint Retrospectives, or in your organizational/business context, are unable to enforce accountability for, or effectively followup on, action items identified in the Retrospective, then read no further. Your Scrum is Doomed.

Sprint iteration size matters, too: “A 2-week sprint is just enough time for a mini-waterfall, and thus we are all basically whitewater rafting all the time” ( — Dan North).

If:

  • you’re not collecting metrics (at the very least: Capacity, Velocity, Committed vs Completed Story Points, Release Burn Up, possibly correlation between Story Points and Hours, if you’re organization is into that sort of thing, and various forms of Lead Time)
  • or not really paying attention to what they’re telling you
  • and they are not visible to and understood by the whole team

then you have already failed, you just can’t see it yet.

Demo vs Release

On the other end of the spectrum, when the mandate for Scrum or Agile comes top-down, often there is excessive emphasis on ceremonies. Specifically, the end-goal of the Sprint becomes the Demo, rather than the Release. Scrum clearly dictates that no additional or specific effort must be spent on the Demo, it should be more like a natural outcome.

You can have as many Demos as you want, but what really matters for a product is Customer Feedback. Which, just to be clear, is not the same as Internal Management Feedback. Management is inherently biased in favor of your team, after all they very likely played a big part in hiring and building it. 10 internal demos are worth a single demo in front of a potentially paying customer.

The focus, then, should be on the Release of the Potentially Shippable Product Increment (complete with changelog, user documentation, installers, troubleshooting guides and quality reports) rather than an orchestrated demo in a controlled environment. This is where Continuous Integration, Continuous Deployment and more recently, DevOps comes in to the picture. If your Release Process is time consuming, unpredictable, not automated and/or has too many dependencies that are not in your control, your team is not yet Agile.

Dependencies

If your software dev team is Agile, but the rest of the organization is not, Agile is going to fail. By rest of the organization, I mean other dev teams that they have dependencies on, manufacturing, HR, Admin, IT — every single department in the organization needs to understand, live and breathe Agile. Because if they can’t respond to change effectively, then they will hold your software dev team back.

The most effective way of crippling a self-organizing Agile team is to give them full accountability, with limited or no influence over those responsible for potential impediments.

Another assured path to mayhem is when multiple teams work on a shared codebase in concurrent sprints, or when a dependency is being iterated on in the same sprint as a feature that needs to be delivered.

The Bottomless Backlog

Often in geographically distributed teams, and/or on large scale projects, the physical Scrum Task Board is replaced by a more practical virtual one. Such task boards, like those provided by JIRA Agile, Rally, Trello and several others, replace Post-Its by virtual cards, enhanced by features such as attachments, comments, time tracking and reporting. Just like any other application of technology, there is a flip side: It just a matter of a few clicks and keystrokes to add something to your Product Backlog, or to alter project plans in a significant way by moving tasks around. It’s very easy to get carried away, and often we start injecting scope creep into the Backlog, disguised as finer details of existing features (for example see User Stories vs The User’s Story).

If your organization uses different tools for Requirements Management and Project Tracking, and if there’s no strict mapping from requirements to user stories (yes, it happens 🙂 ), then it becomes very easy to lose control of the project without realizing it. A more typical scenario is working with a limited budget (usually allocated upfront),  but adding tasks endlessly — kind of like a fractal with fixed surface area, but infinite perimeter. Even with regular Backlog Grooming and prioritization, your team will still feel dissatisfied because a major chunk of the Product Backlog will end up remaining undelivered.

Finally, if you’re not in a position where you can compromise features over quality, then your Agility is severely limited.

Upfront Architecture and Specification

Probably the biggest excuse we use Agile for is to do away with high-level architecture altogether. Different Sprint teams work on different areas of the project, each optimizing locally and focused on the immediate Sprint (or two). Eventually it becomes apparent that several teams have been solving the same problem, maybe (surprise) even in different ways. The Scrum of Scrums can help, but on the rare occasions when it does happen, it is more focused on execution than design. Towards the end, more incompatibilities surface and there is a rush to “adapt the Architecture to the Business Reality”, which is basically an update of the Architectural artifacts based on the code being delivered, rather than the other way round.

So let’s recap:

  1. Being Agile does not mean no design, it means less upfront design.
  2. There needs to be traceability from Requirements to Specification to Architecture to Design to Execution to Validation to Deployment. It doesn’t matter what you call these things in the context of your Industry, but just because you aren’t doing Waterfall doesn’t mean you can decouple execution from specification.
  3. Technical Delegation is not the same as Management Delegation. If you ask 5 teams to report progress using a specific tool, they will all report it the same way. But if you ask 5 self-organizing Scrum Teams to architect a technical solution, you will get at least 3 different results, if not 5 (or 7 with secondary recommendations).

Read on for some recommended solutions. I would love to hear your thoughts and experiences, please leave a comment or connect with me on Twitter: @survivalcrziest

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Scrum, Kanban, Scrumban or Just Ban Scrum? (Part 1 of 2)”

  1. Recent Popular Posts | Survival of the Craziest Says:

    […] Scrum, Kanban, Scrumban or Just Ban Scrum? (and Part 2) […]

  2. “Agile Architecture”: Is Your Product’s Architecture Simply a Reflection of its Release Schedule? | Survival of the Craziest Says:

    […] The team and PO might even recognize the Technical Debt and add it to the backlog, to be dealt with in the future at a lower priority (although that tends to lead towards a Bottomless Backlog) […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: