Takeaways from Craft Conference 2014, Budapest – Day 3

Continued from Day 2, here are the talks from Day 3 in order of my personal preference (and relevance) which may differ from yours:

Complex Projects aren’t planable but controllable

by Jutta Eckstein (Slides | Video)

Sadly, Jutta’s slides aren’t available online but the talk was packed with solid advice for Project Managers. Some of them were:

  • Our predictions are usually based on a coherent story, not a complex, dynamically changing reality
  • Targets should be ambitions, not absolute
  • Focus on the value gained, rather estimates of the effort required
  • Having an  annual budget is like having a bank that opens for business only once a year
  • Annual budgets are not optimal because they are never underutilized: the excess (if any) is still used up, never returned back
  • Consider [event-based] rolling budgets, rolling plans and rolling control
  • Check value and progress regularly
  • Don’t just trust the experts, seek feedback from diverse groups
  • Have different planning strategies for Roadmap (themes only), Release (features based on value & velocity) and Iteration (Stories based on value (+estimate) & velocity)

Recommended reading:

Architecture War Stories

by Stefan Tilkov (Slides | Video)

Probably the most amusing talk of the event. Stefan shared some hilarious real-life examples of architectural disasters… some of them still very much in use (of course no names were revealed). His advice was to go back to the basics:

  • Make data free of code dependencies
  • If it makes you want to pull your eyes out, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it
  • Better ask for forgiveness than permission
  • Development environment is not the same as production environment
  • Feedback, reflection, iteration

Responsibly maximizing craftsmanship in software engineering

by Theo Schlossnagle (Slides | Video)

Theo revisited the basic problems plaguing software development today and went on to share some of his experiences at Circonus. One of the tips was to treat all software you write as open-source within the organization, even if you don’t plan to release the source outside. Other highlights:

  • Turtles all the way down: Software at scale is tied together with loose string & hope
  • We use human language to describe software specifications, and this can be interpreted by different people in different ways (like poetry)
  • Technical debt is non-linear; large monolithic components are more likely to fail because they are hard to maintain
  • Reusability is good, but use the right tools for the right purpose. Accept that that right tool may not yet exist and may need to be written
  • Diversity is an emergent property of scale
  • Thou shalt be judged by your API

For software developers, the message was loud and clear:

kPhone_IMG_0951

Data-Driven Software Engineering

by Jevgeni Kabanov (Slides | Video)

Jevgeni went thorough the effort of analyzing 1000+ projects on Productivity, Quality and Predictability. Sadly the slides aren’t available, but the raw data they were based on is. You can still watch the video and grasp the most important points, such as the fact that the best software projects are delivered 80% of the time on schedule and still have 25% critical issues. Or that automated tests improve quality by 26%. There were also secondary interpretations such as code reviews improve architecture, not just code quality.

Jevgeni emphasized on the importance of measure & experiment over simply “doing agile”. Some suggestions for measurement were:

  • Deadline misses
  • Scope changes
  • Blockers after release
  • User satisfaction

The presentation became a bit controversial later but as Jevgeni said: “People, chill – I gathered data and presented my analysis – feel free to take the data and do a better job”. And I think this talk had the most creative closing slide ever 😉

Without Present or Past: How to Think Distributed – The Hard Way

by Endre Sandor Varga (Slides | Video)
By far the most profound and philosophical talks at Craft. If you have an interest in Distributed Systems, AI or Information Architecture, I would strongly recommend watching the video. The core concept was based on applying epsitemic thinking to systems that are distributed, concurrent, able to fail independently, and communicate over a lossy medium with non-deterministic communication delay. Endre touched upon:
  • Two Armies Problem
  • The final important message
  • Difference between actual state and observed state
  • The Omnipotent Observer (doesn’t exist, because state is always queried)
  • Global introspection and self-awareness
  • Cone of the past
  • The present is volatile and subjective
  • Going from someone knows -> someone knows everyone knows -> everyone knows everyone knows

Endre ended with this advice:

  • Have a properly defined failure model
  • Never assume reliable communication
  • Never assume common knowledge

Functional Reactive Programming in Elm and JS

by Evan Czaplicki (Slides | Video)

Evan is the designer of the Elm language and his enthusiasm is infectious. Over the course of his talk, he built and demonstrated a simplified (yet slick) Mario game complete with physics and reaction to keyboard inputs. Elm is a Functional Reactive Programming language for web browser based GUIs and this game was a fine demonstration of concepts that Bodil Stokke and Jonas Boner touched upon in their respective talks.

There is no doubt that Elm is a game-changer. Here is another example of traffic simulation.

Further reading:

Find the Right Abstraction Level for Your Tests

by Gerard Meszaros (Slides | Video)

If you’ve ever been haunted by the question of what level of testing is enough (and who hasn’t?) then this presentation was for you. The key message was to think in terms of not what you can add, but what you can leave out of the test: “if it isn’t essential to conveying the essence of the behavior, it is essential to not include it”. Over 39 slides, Gerard illustrated this step-by-step with one, continuous, easy-to-follow example.

Software Psychology: The Art of Listening to Code

by Bjorn Freeman-Benson (Slides | Video)

Bjorn talked about the concept of code screams: behavioral indications of a deeper problem in the system. For me the key takeaway was that you should continuously monitor your processes as well as your systems in production (e.g. by gathering usage statistics) and fix the root cause when a problem is found.

Others

Here are some talks that I missed, but which received a lot of positive feedback. Thanks to ustream.tv they are available online. Also check out #CraftConf on Eventifier.

Jackstones: the journey to mastery

by Dan North (Slides | Video)

McDonalds, Six Sigma, and Offshore Outsourcing: Unexpected Sources of Insight

by Chad Fowler (Slides | Video)

Testing the Hard Stuff and Staying Sane

by John Hughes (Slides | Video)

The Better Parts

by Douglas Crockford (Slides | Video)

Functional Examples from Category Theory

by Alissa Pajer (Slides | Video)

 

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