Dance Protocol

Just found this on a Ministry of Sound tape while cleaning out my cabinet:

“Good club music is like good sex. A suggestive kick drum. A tension-building
snare roll. An instantly  recognizable sample looping against a cacophony of
acid bass and bellpy synth, building, mounting, until there’s nothing left for
it to do but burst into a wash of pure Bacchanalian pleasure for the ear and
body. Not all dance music is like that – drop reliant, up-tempo, energetic – but
club music, the world’s new coming-of-age soundtrack, is. Where it was once an
underground indulgence, reserved for those who sought it out, the whole
experience of the nightclub – of coming home from work or school, watching TV,
napping, then showering and getting dressed for the night ahead – is now a
standard rite of passage. Hands-on and participatory, clubbing serves the
entertainment needs of the individual, and also manages to create meaningful
moments between thousands of people at once. Whether it’s singing along to a
diva-driven house anthem, or prepping for the big drop in a trance epic, flashes
of nightclub glory, however fleeting, stay burned in every dancer’s memory.
Dancing is a primal mode of expression and communication, as old as time –
clubbing is our modern update, adding fashion, style and attitude to the mix.
All this makes clubbing everyone’s dirty little secret – it’s a subculture in
which we all participate, on some level, with its own vocabulary and set of
norms. And despite very focused mainstream attention, it maintains its
underground spirit. There’s still something naughty and inviting about an
evening out with a thousand or so of your peers, dressed to the nines, and
dancing to music that, by its nature, teases your primal tendencies and demands
your involvement and activity. Repetitive beats will never complete the circle
and dominate popular music or culture – they’ll always remain just beneath the
surface, providing providing a haven not for the rebels, but for the rebel in
all of us.”

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